Leveraging the Trusted Tester for Web Certification to improve Mason’s web accessibility response

Handouts

Scheduled at 9:15am in Mattie Silks on Wednesday, November 16.

#36142

Speaker(s)

  • Korey Singleton, ATI Manager, George Mason University
  • Kristine Neuber, IT Accessibility Coordinator, George Mason University

Session Details

  • Length of Session: 1-hr
  • Format: Lecture
  • Expertise Level: All Levels
  • Type of session: General Conference

Summary

During the Spring 2022 semester, leveraging the Department of Homeland Security's self-paced Trusted Tester for Web Certification Course, ATI staff led a cohort of GMU web content authors and developers through how to Build the capacity of ATI’s identify and report issues related to inaccessible web content. This presentation will highlight how this cohort was structured, who participated, costs involved, and the findings from this effort.

Abstract

Last fall, ATI staff conducted a series of in-person/virtual debriefing sessions with strategic partners (i.e., Disability Services, Stearns Center, Communications, ITS Web Administration, ITS – Teaching and Learning Group, etc.) to identify gaps in Mason’s digital accessibility response efforts. While many commented that ATI services (i.e., captioning and transcription, document remediation, web accessibility) and resources (ATI websites, training) have been well received, few understand how or have the confidence to address digital accessibility-related concerns on their own. The two biggest areas of concern involved the expansion of our document remediation efforts and supporting our existing web accessibility strategy. Collectively, it was suggested that additional work is needed to move our strategic partners from just being aware of digital accessibility to understanding how to identify and remediate issues on their own.

Over the course of the Spring 2022 semester, ATI staff, leveraging the Trusted Tester for Web Conformance Test Process Version 5 (TTV5) offered by the Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Accessible Systems & Technology, led a cohort of GMU content authors and web developers through how to identify issues related to inaccessible web content.

The TTV5 is comprised of a series of self-paced, web-based modules that offer guidance not only on the requirements and importance of Section 508/WCAG but also how to identify and report Section 508 conformance-related issues. The TTV5 is offered at no cost to those who enroll and participants had 12 weeks from the date of self-enrollment to complete the training modules, the practice test, and the final exam.

This presentation will highlight how this cohort was structured, who participated, costs involved, and the findings from this effort.

Keypoints

  1. Strategic partners are critical to your institution's digital accessibility response.
  2. Mason's web content authors and developers needed additional guidance on how to identify web a11y issues.
  3. Offering incentives can be a valuable way to advance your digital accessibility mission.

Disability Areas

All Areas

Topic Areas

Administrative/Campus Policy, Uncategorized, Web/Media Access

Speaker Bio(s)

Korey Singleton

Korey Singleton earned his Master's in Assistive/Special Education Technology at George Mason University in 2006 and his Ph.D. in Education (concentration: Learning Technologies Design Research), with a focus on integrating UDL into the online course development process in 2017. He has worked for over 14 years as the Assistive Technology Initiative (ATI) Manager for George Mason University (GMU). The ATI operates under GMU’s Office for Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and is tasked with guiding and implementing a university-wide strategy for addressing the information and communications technology accessibility needs of students, staff, faculty, and visitors with disabilities. For over 25 years, he has advocated for technology accessibility and the use of assistive technology by individuals with disabilities at home, at work, and in the classroom.

Kristine Neuber

Kristine earned her Master's in Assistive/Special Education Technology at George Mason University in 1997 and her Ph.D. in Special Education, with a focus on disability policy and assistive technology in 2013. She has been with George Mason University for more than 20 years in a variety of positions in the area of Assistive Technology. Kristine is currently the IT Accessibility Coordinator with the Assistive Technology Initiative at Mason. Her primary responsibility is to help ensure that Mason’s electronic resources, including web sites, hardware and software applications are accessible to individuals with disabilities. She has also taught graduate courses for Mason in both the Visual Impairment and Assistive Technology Programs.

Handout(s)