It is all about the student; selecting the right reading app for student success.

Bios & Handouts

Scheduled at 8:00am in Westminster IV on Wednesday, November 14.

#17765

Speaker(s)

  • Richard Orme, Mr, DAISY Consortium

Session Details

  • Length of Session: 1-hr
  • Format: Lecture
  • Expertise Level: Beginner
  • Type of session: General Conference

Summary

An app or browser extension is needed to read EPUB titles, but they vary a lot in their functionality. When it comes to learners with disabilities, which apps will enable them to excel at their studies? This session presents an initiative that aims to answer that question.

Abstract

There are many ways to read an EPUB, so how do advise your learners? Extensive testing of Reading Apps and browser implementations have been conducted at by our volunteers team of more than 50 persons with disabilities using assistive technology. We will explain the rigorous methodology, the interactions with app developers, and the latest test results. This will lead to a discussion of how a DSO office can help a student with a disability pick the right app or device for them to effectively study, take notes, and enjoy reading.

Keypoints

  1. Apps offer different levels of accessibility provisions
  2. A test framework has been developed and has been extensively used by a large team of crowd source volunteers
  3. The results can help you and your learners choose, and the app developers are improving continuously

Disability Areas

Cognitive/Learning, Mobility, Vision

Topic Areas

Administrative/Campus Policy, Alternate Format, Assistive Technology, eBooks, EPUB Track, Including Accessibility in Curriculum, Information Resources, Other, Uncategorized, Web/Media Access

Speaker Bio(s)

Richard Orme

When teaching in a college in rural England more than 30 years ago, Richard encountered his first blind student, beginning a career in what we now refer to as accessibility. He has worked for local, national and international organizations, with young, old, and very old people, with visual, physical, dual sensory and cognitive disabilities. For over twenty years Richard worked at RNIB, where he conducted more than 400 technology assessments for people with sight loss in education or employment. Having identified a critical lack of accessible curriculum materials, Richard led an initiative for a national database of accessible textbooks, now grown to become the UK Education Collection operating as RNIB Bookshare.

Richard is Chief Executive of the DAISY Consortium, the global organization whose mission is to develop standards and solutions for accessible publishing and reading. He is Chair of the Right to Read Alliance in the UK, a founding member of the UK Publishers Association Accessibility Action Group, serves on the board of the Accessible Books Consortium (an initiative of the UN agency WIPO) and is a director of the regional blind association in the county where he lives. He volunteers in his community providing home visiting support for people with disabilities. Richard’s brother James has a profound learning disability, and his son Jim has dyslexia. Whether in his work, volunteering or as a family member, Richard is in regular contact with publishers, technology companies, special libraries, and many people with disabilities who want to read books and other publications for their work, study or pleasure.

Handout(s)