How and What Syllabi Analysis Can Tell Us About Accessibility, Teaching, and Learning

Scheduled at 9:15am in Virtual Room 1 on Wednesday, November 17.

#34621

Speaker(s)

  • Melissa Green, Technology Accessibility Specialist, University of Alabama

Session Details

  • Length of Session: 1-hr
  • Format: Lecture
  • Expertise Level: All Levels
  • Type of session: General Conference

Summary

This session will share the methodology and results of a text analysis of undergraduate course syllabi seeking to identify mentions of “accessibility," “universal design,” WCAG, and other related concepts. This information is being used to assess where and how accessibility is taught and learned at a large public research university and to inform outreach and education efforts.

Abstract

We can analyze the contents of syllabi to assess course content and instructional strategies, identify opportunities for collaboration, and inform our outreach and education efforts. This session will share the methodology and results of a text analysis of course syllabi seeking to identify mentions of “accessibility” (accessib*), “universal design,” WCAG, and other related concepts in undergraduate courses at a large public research university. The presenter will demonstrate using qualitative data analysis software to identify words and phrases describing accessibility-related concepts, coding to bring references together and identify themes and patterns, and approaches to sharing results. Participants will leave with strategies and resources you can use to better understand if and how accessibility is currently taught and learned on your campus and to conduct targeted outreach to bring together students, faculty, and campus accessibility partners to advance accessibility in higher education curriculums.

Keypoints

  1. We can analyze college and university course syllabi to better understand where and how accessibility is taught and learned.
  2. We can use qualitative data analysis software to explore references to accessibility concepts in syllabi.
  3. Syllabi analysis results can inform curriculum design and our outreach and education efforts.

Disability Areas

All Areas

Topic Areas

Faculty Development & Support, Research, Teaching about Accessibility in Curriculum, Uncategorized

Speaker Bio(s)

Melissa Green

Melissa Green is a teacher, librarian, technology enthusiast, and an IAAP Certified Professional in Accessibility Core Competencies (CPACC). A Technology Accessibility Specialist with The University of Alabama’s Center for Instructional Technology, Melissa helps to ensure that technology users, including those with disabilities, have a functional and accessible technology experience with the university’s web presence and instructional and emerging technologies. Melissa holds an MEd in curriculum and instruction with a concentration in assistive technology from George Mason University and an MLIS from The University of Alabama, where she is currently pursuing a PhD in Instructional Leadership with a concentration in instructional technology. Melissa embraces technology’s potential to foster access and inclusion for all, a perspective informed by her work in the disability community, libraries, and information technology.