Using an SLC (Staff Learning Community) to Share UDL & Accessibility Strategies

Bios & Handouts

Scheduled at 3:30pm in WB II on Wednesday November, 15.

#9093

Speaker(s)

  • Deb Castiglione, Universal Design & Instructional Technology Spec, University of Kentucky

Session Details

  • Length of Session: 1-hr
  • Format: Lecture
  • Expertise Level: Beginner
  • Type of session: General Conference

Summary

Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) have been successful in developing a cooperative educational spirit through a shared learning experience. Learn how at the University of Kentucky a Staff Learning Community (SLC) was developed to cooperatively share learning and the charge to address the extensive UDL and accessibility training needs on campus.

Abstract

Training faculty and staff in Universal Design for Learning (UDL) and accessibility campus-wide can be a daunting task, especially when it needs to be done by an individual or few staff members who have other responsibilities in addition to training on UDL and accessibility. In an effort to make this training a more efficient and effective endeavor, the University of Kentucky formed a learning community of staff members. The staff learning community (SLC) started with specific learning objectives to drive the process. The ultimate goals were to cooperatively train each other, develop workshops, create resource materials, and then train others. Learn how the SLC was developed to address UDL and accessibility training needs on campus, the collaborative products of the group, and the benefits and challenges of the SLC.

Keypoints

  1. Discuss the formation of a staff learning community.
  2. Express the importance of collaboration in UDL and accessibility training.
  3. Identify the benefits and challenges of a staff learning community (SLC).

Disability Areas

Cognitive/Learning, Deaf/Hard of Hearing, Mobility, Vision

Topic Areas

Faculty Instruction/Accessible Course Design, Uncategorized

Speaker Bio(s)

Deb Castiglione

Deb Castiglione is the Universal Design & Instructional Technology Specialist at the University of Kentucky, where she earned a doctorate in distance learning. She brings skills, knowledge, and experience in instructional design/development, universal design, accessibility, and assistive technology. Deb has worked with children and adults with disabilities. She has developed and taught courses in instructional design, assistive technology, universal design, distance education: delivery, and instructional technology for the University of Kentucky, Gateway Community & Technical College, the University of Cincinnati, and Northern Kentucky University.

Handout(s)