Open and Accessible: low cost and inclusive by design

Bios & Handouts

Scheduled at 9:15am in Lakehouse on Wednesday, November 14.

#17821

Speaker(s)

  • Kaela Parks, Portland Comm. College

Session Details

  • Length of Session: 1-hr
  • Format: Lecture
  • Expertise Level: Intermediate
  • Type of session: General Conference

Summary

Open education can lower textbook costs for students, but the movement also allows accessibility personnel to partner with instructional faculty, and librarians to foster inclusive course design. Open licensing allows users to Retain, Reuse, Revise, Remix, and Redistribute, which can allow accessibility related features to improve over time.

Abstract

Read about the Intersection of Accessibility and OER - https://tinyurl.com/oer-access.

Participants will leave the session armed with data regarding the adoption and efficacy of OER, as well as hands-on experience with some of the tools and techniques that can be useful. Both pitfalls and opportunities will be discussed in the context of alternate format material provision. Participants will leave the session with a strong set of resources and examples to pull from moving forward.

Keypoints

  1. Open education is about more than lowering textbook costs.
  2. Open materials can be adapted and shared with others.
  3. Open education can address structural barriers but also challenge dominant perspectives and interrupt bias.

Disability Areas

All Areas

Topic Areas

Alternate Format, Assistive Technology, eBooks, Faculty Instruction/Accessible Course Design, Including Accessibility in Curriculum, Uncategorized, Web/Media Access

Speaker Bio(s)

Kaela Parks

Kaela Parks, M.Ed. . is the Director of Disability Services at Portland Community College. She is a former Co-Chair of the AHEAD Standing Committee on Technology, a past Chair of the NASPA Disability Knowledge Community, and a past President of ORAHEAD. She was lead trainer for a FIPSE demonstration project aimed at supporting adjunct faculty on rural campuses in the implementation of Universal Design, and was co-editor of the publication titled "Beyond the ADA:Proactive Policy and Practice for Higher Education." She frequently offers trainings and presentations on a variety of disability and accessibility related topics.

Handout(s)