An Evaluation of Accessibility for a Large Foundations of Engineering Course

Bios & Handouts

Scheduled at 11:45am in Meadowbrook II on Friday November, 17.

#10317

Speaker(s)

  • Elizabetth Spingola, Virginia Tech

Session Details

  • Length of Session: 1-hr
  • Format: Lecture
  • Expertise Level: All Levels
  • Type of session: General Conference

Summary

The presentation will address: formal assessment of multiple sections of FYE for accessibility, methods and results disseminate of the findings to the instructional team responsible for content development and discuss the development of guidelines specific to the first-year sequence. Research based strategies on how to created accessible e-courses.

Abstract

Incoming engineering students are required to take EngE 1215: Foundations of Engineering in their first semester at Virginia Tech. In Fall 2017, we will see a record enrollment of approximately 2100 students. Course content is delivered via Canvas, a Learning Management System. To this point, there has been done little to assess whether accessibility guidelines are met, whether intentionally or unintentionally (that is, under an assumption that Canvas 'manages' accessibility concerns). The presentation will address 1) formal assessment of multiple sections of EngE 1215 for accessibility; 2) methods and results disseminate of the findings to the instructional team responsible for content development and 3) discuss the development of guidelines specific to the first-year sequence (EngE 1215 and 1216). Research based strategies on how to created accessible digitally mediated First Year Engineering course material.

Keypoints

  1. First year engineering
  2. Learning Management Systems
  3. Accessible course design

Disability Areas

accessible design, Cognitive/Learning

Topic Areas

Faculty Instruction/Accessible Course Design, Information Technology, Uncategorized, Web/Media Access

Speaker Bio(s)

Elizabetth Spingola

Liz was the first person in the nation to graduate with a B.S. in Engineering Education from Ohio Northern University with a minor in Mathematics in May, 2014. In generalities, this degree acts as a general engineering degree with a concentration in Computer Science and a Mathematics Education degree with a minor in Mathematics. With this, Liz earned her 7-12 Ohio teaching license in Mathematics. Currently, she is a graduate students at Virginia Tech where she is working on completing her Masters in Data Analytics and Applied Statistics and her PhD in Engineering Education surrounding computer science design standards for cognitively disabled individuals. Liz is a Graduate Assistant for the Instructional Technology Team. She provides technical support for the engineering software used by faculty and students throughout the College of Engineering including DyKnow, OneNote, Microsoft, and Inking. Additional tasks tasks include the support and editing of website content, documentation and creation of software tutorials, teaching of support classes, and support for tablet use.

Handout(s)